JoLMA

The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts
     topic: philosophy, anthropology and religion  
  • e-ISSN 2723-9640
  • Periodicity biannual
  • Permalink doi.org
  • Language it, fr, de, en
Aims & Scope

The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts is an online, biannual, periodical journal, published by Edizioni Ca’ Foscari Digital Publishing.The Journal is the expression of an active research group based at the Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage of Ca’ Foscari University, in Venice (Italy). The same group of scholars previously founded a research centre called CLAVeS, which currently gathers the scientific activities (seminars, conferences, meetings, etc.) that its members hold in Venice. The research topics this Journal investigates stand between Philosophy of Language, Philosophy of Mind, Aesthetics, and Philosophy of Art. Hence, the Journal is intended to offer a chance to develop a thorough and interdisciplinary research (in terms of both interrelations and exchanges within the international scientific community. Furthermore, the Journal is set to provide the opportunity to discuss several theoretical issues, which lie at the core of contemporary philosophical and scientific debate.No particular school or theoretical orientation as well as attitude is excluded a priori. Indeed, contributors are asked to hold an open perspective without any dogmatism, as well as due rigour of argumentation and thematic choices, in order to abide by the richness and variety of theoretical approaches and visions.

General info

Boards
  • peopleBoards
    Editor-in-Chief
    Luigi Perissinotto, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia    

    Advisory Board
    Jocelyn Benoist, Université de Paris 1, Panthéon-Sorbonne    
    Annalisa Coliva, University of California, USA    
    Pascal Engel, EHESS, Paris    
    Shaun Gallagher, University of Memphis, USA; University of Wollongong, Australia    
    Garry L. Hagberg, Bard College, New York, USA    
    Wolfgang Huemer, Università degli Studi di Parma, Italia    
    Daniel Hutto, University of Wollongong, Australia    
    John Hyman, University College, London, UK    
    Oskari Kuusela, East Anglia University, UK    
    Michael Lüthy, Bauhaus-Universität, Weimar, Deutschland    
    Diego Marconi, Università degli Studi di Torino, Italia    
    Anna Marmodoro, University of Oxford, UK    
    Kevin Mulligan, Université de Genève, Suisse    
    Elisa Paganini, Università Statale di Milano, Italia    
    Claudio Paolucci, Alma Mater Studiorum, Università di Bologna, Italia    
    Francesca Piazza, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Italia    
    Vicente Sanfélix Vidarte, Universitat de València, España    
    Pierre Steiner, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, France    
    Claudine Tiercelin, Collège de France, Paris, France    
    Nicla Vassallo, Università degli Studi di Genova, Italia    
    Jesús Vega Encabo, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, España    

    Editorial Board
    Cristina Baldacci, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Pietro Conte, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Marco Dalla Gassa, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Roberta Dreon, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Susanne Franco, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Mattia Geretto, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Alessandra Jacomuzzi, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Diego Mantoan, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Eleonora Montuschi, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Gian Luigi Paltrinieri, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Luigi Perissinotto, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Begoña Ramón Cámara, Universitat de València, España    
    Carlos Vára Sanchez, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    

    Editorial assistants
    Filippo Batisti, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Alessandro Cavazzana, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Marco Gigante, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Alice Morelli, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Francesco Ragazzi, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Elena Valeri, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    

    Managing Editor
    Luigi Perissinotto, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    

Proposal / Submission

Use the form to submit a proposal
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APCs

The article processing charges are regulated by the Publisher. For more information please visit: Publish with us.

Peer review

Every article published by ECF was accepted for publication by no less than two qualified reviewers as a result of a process of anonymous reviewing (double-blind peer review).

The reviewers are independent of the authors and not affiliated with the same institution.

The Journal’s/Series’ Scientific Director guarantees the proper execution of the peer review process for every article published in the Journal/Series. The evaluation is conducted in accordance with the following criteria:
Revision policies for the different sections:

  • Complete volume/issue: subject to peer review
  • Monographs/essays/articles: subject to peer review
  • Introductions, prefaces: no peer review
  • Reviews: no peer review
  • Editorials: no peer review
For a complete description of the process, please visit: Publish with us.
Editorial Guidelines
  • listEditorial Guidelines

    To be published all manuscripts must comply with the following guidelines. In case of blatant violation of the guidelines, the editor (ECF) can suspend at any time the manuscript’s publication.

    The instructions for the preparation of your manuscript, its abstract and its bibliography, are an integral part of the requirements for the manuscript submission. They are downloadable from the menu ‘Publish with us’ at the item ‘Editorial Guidelines’.

    • Manuscript Preparation
    • Document Basic Structure
    • Document Composition
    • Source Citation System
    • General Bibliography


    To find out more, please contact Edizioni Ca’ Foscari’s editorial staff at ecf@unive.it.

Call
  • call_to_actionCall for papers
    CALL FOR PAPERS (JOLMA 3 | 1 | 2022)

    Greek and Contemporary Philosophies of Language Face to Face

    Editor: Begoña Ramón Cámara

    In the last hundred years, language has been at the centre of interest in philosophy, so much so that we have come to speak, with reference above all to the philosophy that developed between the 1920s and the end of the century, of a “linguistic turn”. Nor should it be forgotten that this interest in language, which certainly distinguished analytic philosophy, also involved much “continental” philosophy (it is enough to mention Heidegger, philosophical hermeneutics, or Derrida).

    The same decades also saw a great development of the investigation of the conception of language in ancient Greek, Roman and late ancient philosophy. The works on the theme of language in the sophists, Plato, Aristotle, the Hellenistic philosophies, Neo-Platonism, Augustine and the Patristic, etc., are increasingly numerous.

    In this panorama there are two points that deserve more attention than has been devoted to them so far. The first point concerns contemporary philosophy of language. With a few, albeit notable, exceptions, one feels the lack in contemporary philosophy of language of a systematic study of the previous history of philosophical reflection on language. This is true of the Modern Age (16th-18th centuries) and the Middle Ages; but it is perhaps more true of the Greek, Roman and Late Antiquity. Obviously, all this can be explained by the explicit theoretical orientation of contemporary philosophy of language, especially analytical philosophy; however, this does not exclude that a critical comparison with one’s own history could contribute to enriching and also making more perceptive the current philosophical research on language.

    The second point concerns research into ancient conceptions of language. Perhaps in order not to fall into anachronisms or an undue updating of ancient thought, many scholars have avoided using contemporary theoretical acquisitions on language in their approach to Greek, Roman or Late Antiquity conceptions. This is an entirely understandable caution. However, this does not exclude that, read in the light of the current philosophy of language, many ancient pages may reveal new aspects to us, and that the historical reconstruction may come out richer and more percipient.

    In this issue we would like to bring together (a) essays that, from the contemporary philosophy of language, want to reflect on the Greek past of language research, without renouncing the theoretical motivation of the research; (b) essays that, committed to the research on Greek conceptions of language, want to confront what has happened in the last century in the reflection on language. One of the aims of this issue is also to collect essays that investigate (c) the way in which some contemporary philosophers of language (Austin, Wittgenstein, Davidson, etc.) have confronted Greek thought; (d) the cases in which Greek texts on language have been read and interpreted in the light of this or that contemporary theory of language (for example, the Cratylus and contemporary theories of reference).

    Invited Contributors:

    • Juan José Acero
    • James C. Klagge
    • Marcello La Matina
    • Lidia Palumbo
    • Luigi Perissinotto
    • Francesca Piazza
    • Mauro Serra

    Submission deadline: February 28th, 2022

    Notification of acceptance: April 15th, 2022

    Articles must be written in English and should not exceed 6,500 words. The instructions for authors can be consulted in the journal’s website: ‘Editorial Guidelines’.

    Submissions must be suitable for blind review. Each submission should also include a brief abstract of no more than 650 words and five keywords for indexing purposes. Notification of intent to submit, including both a title and a brief summary of the content, will be greatly appreciated, as it will assist with the coordination and planning of the issue.

    For any question, please use the following address: Begoña Ramón Cámara begonia.ramon@gmail.com.

    Please submit your proposals to the email jolma_editor@unive.it or using the section ‘Submit’ of the journal’s website.



    CALL FOR PAPERS (JOLMA 3 | 2 | 2022)

    Translation as Interpretation

    Editors: Francesco Camera and Gian Luigi Paltrinieri

    What does it mean to translate and in what sense is translating constitutively interpreting? This issue is aimed to address these and many other related questions.

    Clearly, translating cannot be reduced to moving a meaning from a remote linguistic vehicle to a more familiar one: “the purpose of translation by no means is that of bringing what has been said closer” (M. Heidegger, GA 51, p. 96), but, rather, that of allowing distance and strangeness to emerge within our target language. The relationship with distant or untimely texts is neither peaceful nor reassuring, and therefore (!) it opens up possibilities, it discloses different futures to the present. We can say, furthermore, that the first crucial consequence the work of the translator-interpreter produces is a disruption of the inertial absolutization of that present which is settled in our usual saying and, thus, appears to us immediately decipherable or as the only possible one.

    On the other hand, it was some grandiose translating interpretations that led to powerful historical effects, decisively marking the cultural, philosophical and theological path of Europe and of the Mediterranean basin. Just to mention a few of them: the translation of the Bible into Latin by St. Jerome or that of the Seventy into Greek, the translation into Latin of Aristotle’s logical works by Boethius, the German translations of the Bible by Luther or the Sophoclean Antigone by Hölderlin, the first English translations of Plato by Thomas Taylor and Benjamin Jowett. All these have been interpretations that, even when they have forced or misunderstood the original, they have in any case broadened and put back in motion the significance of the target language, whose linguisticity has opened up different, fruitful ways of experiencing the world.

    Another set of questions arises if we look at the everyday. Today all over the planet people speak the English language or translate their own into English. What happens to native English speakers if they get used to believing that they have no need to translate their mother tongue? And what does it mean for non-native English speakers if they get used to translating all their own thoughts and experiences? Of course, translating also has powerful ethical and political implications, as well as existential ones. And, by the way, it is a fact that we constantly need to translate and interpret within our own language: as Quine puts it, we must be aware that “radical translation begins at home” (W.V.O. Quine, Ontological Relativity, p. 46).

    With the purpose of addressing these and other problems raised by translation and interpretation, in this issue we would like to collect essays on the following topics:

    Invited Contributors:

    • Francesco Camera
    • Carla Canullo
    • Richard Capobianco
    • Massimiliano De Villa
    • Jean Grondin
    • Éliane Laverdure

    Submission deadline: May 31st, 2022

    Notification of acceptance: July 15th, 2022

    Articles must be written in English and should not exceed 6,500 words. The instructions for authors can be consulted in the journal’s website: ‘Editorial Guidelines’.

    Submissions must be suitable for blind review. Each submission should also include a brief abstract of no more than 650 words and five keywords for indexing purposes. Notification of intent to submit, including both a title and a brief summary of the content, will be greatly appreciated, as it will assist with the coordination and planning of the issue.

    For any question, please use the following address: Francesco Camera camera@nous.unige.it and Gian Luigi Paltrinieri gpaltri@unive.it.

    Please submit your proposals to the email jolma_editor@unive.it or using the section ‘Submit’ of the journal’s website.

Policy
  • codeComplete journal policy

    Ethical Code of The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts

    The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts is a peer-reviewed scientific journal whose policy is inspired by the COPE (Committee on Publication Ethics) Ethical Code. See the Best Practice Guidelines for Journal Editors.

    Publisher responsibilities  

    The Publisher must provide the Journal with adequate resources and the guidance of experts, in order to carry out its role in the most professional way, aiming at the highest quality standard.

    The Publisher must have a written agreement that defines the relationship with the owner of the Journal and/or the Editor-in-Chief. The agreement must comply with the Code of Behavior for Publishers of Scientific Journals, as established by COPE.

    The relationship among the Editor-in-Chief, the Editorial Board and the Publisher is based on the principle of publishing independence. 

    Editors responsibilities 

    The Editor-in-Chief and the Editorial Board of The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts alone are responsible for the decision to publish the articles submitted.

    Submitted articles, after having been checked for plagiarism by means of the anti-plagiarism software Compilatio that is used by the University and is made available to us, will be sent to at least two reviewers. Final acceptance presumes the implementation of possible amendments, as required by the reviewers and under the supervision of the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors.

    The The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors and Editorial Board must evaluate each submitted paper in compliance with the Journalʼs policy, i.e. exclusively on the basis of its scientific content, without discrimination of race, sex, gender, creed, ethnic origin, citizenship, or the scientific, academic and political position of the Authors. 

    If the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors and Editorial Board notice (or receive notifications of) mistakes or inaccuracies, conflict of interest or plagiarism in a published article, they will immediately warn the Author and the Publisher and will undertake the necessary actions to resolve the issue. If necessary, they will withdraw the article or publish a recantation. 

    Authors responsibilities

    Stylesheet

    Authors must follow the Guidelines for Authors to be downloaded from the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts website. 

    No multiple submissions 

    Authors must explicitly state that their work is original in all its parts and that the submitted paper has not been previously published, nor submitted to other journals, until the entire evaluation process is completed. Since no paper gets published without significant revision, earlier dissemination in conference proceedings or working papers does not preclude consideration for publication, but Authors are expected to fully disclose publication/dissemination of the material in other closely related publications, so that the overlap can be evaluated by the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors. 

    Authorship 

    Authorship must be correctly attributed; all those who have given a substantial contribution to the design, organisation and accomplishment of the research the article is based on, must be indicated as Co-Authors. The respective roles of each co-author should be described in a footnote. The statement that all authors have approved the final version should be included in the disclosure.

    Conflicts of interest and financing 

    Authors, under their own responsibility, must avoid any conflict of interest affecting the results obtained or the interpretations suggested. The The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors will give serious and careful consideration to suggestions of cases in which, due to possible conflict of interest, an Author’s work should not be reviewed by a specific scholar. Authors should indicate any financing agency or the project the article stems from. 

    Quotations

    Authors must see to it that all works consulted be properly quoted. If works or words of others are used, they have to be properly paraphrased or duly quoted. Citations between “double quotes” (or «angled quotation marks» if the text is written in a language other than English) must reproduce the exact wording of the source; under their own responsibility, Authors should carefully refrain from disguising a restyling of the source’s wording, as though it was the original formulation. 

    Ethical Committee

    Whenever required, the research protocols must be authorised in advance by the Ethical Committee of Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. 

    Emendations

    When Authors find a mistake or an inaccuracy in their own article, they must immediately warn the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors, providing all the information needed to make the due adjustments. 

    Reviewers responsibilities

    Goal

    By means of the peer-review procedure, reviewers assist the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors and Editorial Board in taking decisions on the articles submitted. They are expected to offer the Authors suggestions as to possible adjustments aimed at improving their contribution submission. 

    Timing and conflicts of interest 

    If a reviewer does not feel up to the task of doing a given review, or if she/he is unable to read the work within the agreed schedule, she/he should notify the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors. Reviewers must not accept articles for which there is a conflict of interest due to previous contributions or to a competition with a disclosed author (or with an author they believe to have identified). 

    Confidentiality 

    The content of the reviewed work must be considered confidential and must not be used without explicit authorisation by the author, who is to be contacted via the editor-in-chief. Any confidential information obtained during the peer review process should not be used for other purposes.

    Collaborative attitude

    Reviewers should see themselves not as adversaries but as advocates for the field. Any comment must be done in a collaborative way and from an objective point of view. Reviewers should clearly motivate their comments and keep in mind the Golden Rule of Reviewing: “Review for others as you would have others review for you”. 

    Plagiarism 

    Reviewers should report any similarity or overlapping of the work under analysis with other works known to them.