JOLMA

The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts
Topic: Philosphy, Anthropology and Religion  


Aims & Scope

The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts is an online, biannual, periodical journal, published by Edizioni Ca’ Foscari Digital Publishing.The Journal is the expression of an active research group based at the Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage of Ca’ Foscari University, in Venice (Italy). The same group of scholars previously founded a research centre called CLAVeS, which currently gathers the scientific activities (seminars, conferences, meetings, etc.) that its members hold in Venice. The research topics this Journal investigates stand between Philosophy of Language, Philosophy of Mind, Aesthetics, and Philosophy of Art. Hence, the Journal is intended to offer a chance to develop a thorough and interdisciplinary research (in terms of both interrelations and exchanges within the international scientific community. Furthermore, the Journal is set to provide the opportunity to discuss several theoretical issues, which lie at the core of contemporary philosophical and scientific debate.No particular school or theoretical orientation as well as attitude is excluded a priori. Indeed, contributors are asked to hold an open perspective without any dogmatism, as well as due rigour of argumentation and thematic choices, in order to abide by the richness and variety of theoretical approaches and visions.

Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License 
General info
  • peopleBoards
    Editor in chief
    Luigi Perissinotto, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia    

    Advisory Board
    Jocelyn Benoist, Université de Paris 1, Panthéon-Sorbonne    
    Annalisa Coliva, University of California, USA    
    Pascal Engel, EHESS, Paris    
    Shaun Gallagher, University of Memphis, USA; University of Wollongong, Australia    
    Garry L. Hagberg, Bard College, New York, USA    
    Wolfgang Huemer, Università degli Studi di Parma, Italia    
    Daniel Hutto, University of Wollongong, Australia    
    John Hyman, University College, London, UK    
    Oskari Kuusela, East Anglia University, UK    
    Michael Lüthy, Bauhaus-Universität, Weimar, Deutschland    
    Diego Marconi, Università degli Studi di Torino, Italia    
    Anna Marmodoro, University of Oxford, UK    
    Kevin Mulligan, Université de Genève, Suisse    
    Claudio Paolucci, Alma Mater Studiorum, Università di Bologna, Italia    
    Francesca Piazza, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Italia    
    Vicente Sanfélix Vidarte, Universidad de Valencia    
    Pierre Steiner, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, France    
    Claudine Tiercelin, Collège de France, Paris, France    
    Nicla Vassallo, Università degli Studi di Genova, Italia    
    Jesús Vega Encabo, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, España    

    Editorial Board
    Cristina Baldacci, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Pietro Conte, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Marco Dalla Gassa, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Roberta Dreon, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Susanne Franco, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Mattia Geretto, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Alessandra Jacomuzzi, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Diego Mantoan, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Eleonora Montuschi, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Gian Luigi Paltrinieri, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Luigi Perissinotto, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Begoña Ramón Cámara, Universitat de València, España    
    Carlos Vára Sanchez, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    

    Editorial assistants
    Filippo Batisti, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Alessandro Cavazzana, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Marco Gigante, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Alice Morelli, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Francesco Ragazzi, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    
    Elena Valeri, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Italia    

  • messageContacts
    To the General Editor

    I have read the privacy policy

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    3. Proposal submission
    Attachment
  • assignment_turned_inPeer review

    Every article published by ECF was accepted for publication by no less than two qualified reviewers as a result of a process of anonymous reviewing (double-blind peer review).

    The reviewers are independent of the authors and not affiliated with the same institution.

    The Journal’s/Series’ Scientific Director guarantees the proper execution of the peer review process for every article published in the Journal/Series. The evaluation is conducted in accordance with the following criteria:
    Revision policies for the different sections:

    • Complete volume/issue: subject to peer review
    • Monographs/essays/articles: subject to peer review
    • Introductions, prefaces: no peer review
    • Reviews: no peer review
    • Editorials: no peer review
    For a complete description of the process, please see: Scientific Certification of the Works Published by ECF
Call
  • Call for papers
    CALL FOR PAPERS (JOLMA 2 | 1 | 2021)

    Image/images. A debate between philosophy and visual studies

    Editors: Alessandro Cavazzana, Francesco Ragazzi

    As we are frequently told, we live in the age of images and the possibility of their endless manipulation. Yet, when we talk about images, we refer to a set of objects – assuming that we can actually define images as objects – of which it seems difficult to identify a common denominator. What kind of things are we talking about? Paintings or drawings? Mental images? Photographs or digital files? Billboard advertising? And can this multitude be the subject matter of a single discipline? Starting from the past century, at least two main approaches have emerged in the study of the complex phenomenon of images.

    On the one hand, in particular within the context of analytic philosophy, images have been studied as single entities in relationship with both a referent and the perceptual or interpretive abilities of an observer. Starting from the reactions to the illusionistic theory of depiction commonly attributed to Ernst Gombrich, scholars have faced ontological and epistemological problems, that have generated passionate and long-lasting debates. What is an image? What is the difference between images and other symbolic communication systems? By means of what does an image represent something? How do images work? And again, how does a viewer perceive a picture? What role, if any, does imagination play in perceiving an image and what kind of imagination is involved?

    On the other hand, thanks in particular to the iconographic tradition inaugurated by Aby Warburg, images have been analyzed in their multiplicity, in their mutual relationship, both synchronically and diachronically. Hence, scholars have taken into account the problem of anachronism. How are meanings conveyed and transformed through images and their reproduction? How can images from the past be interpreted? How can an art historian – if she can – leave the mental habit of her own time to penetrate that of another age?

    This issue aims at comparing the two disciplinary approaches briefly outlined – i.e., the analytic tradition and the so-called visual culture studies – also considering those technological and cultural innovations that in contemporary times have had an effect on images too. Indeed, one cannot fail to see that images, in particular in the Web, are spread and manipulated in specific ways. Moreover, images increasingly replace the verbal language as a key tool for conveying meanings. To what extent is it possible to compare images to language? How can the elliptical nature of images suggest a diegetic development to the viewer? In short, how do images tell us a story? Finally, the huge number of images produced every day, perhaps requires new analysis methods to better understand this phenomenon. What can studies based on big data analysis tell us about images? What new perspectives can be opened up by computational approaches to visual studies?

    Submission deadline: January 30th, 2021

    Notification of acceptance: March 15th, 2021

    Articles must be written in English and should not exceed 6.500 words. The instructions for authors can be consulted in the journal’s website: ‘Editorial Guidelines’.

    Submissions must be suitable for blind review. Each submission should also include a brief abstract of no more than 650 words and five keywords for indexing purposes. Notification of intent to submit, including both a title and a brief summary of the content, will be greatly appreciated, as it will assist with the coordination and planning of the issue.

    For any query, use please the following addresses: Alessandro Cavazzana alessandro.cavazzana@unive.it, Francesco Ragazzi ragazzi.fr@gmail.com.

    Please submit your proposals to the email jolma_editor@unive.it or using the apposite section ‘Contacts’ of the ‘Journal info’ page.

    Invited Contributors:

    • Katerina Bantinaki, University of Crete
    • Gabriele Ferretti, University of Basel
    • Riccardo Manzotti, IULM (Milano)
    • Jesse Prinz, City University of New York (CUNY)


    CALL FOR PAPERS (JOLMA 2 | 2 | 2021)

    Leibniz on Language and Cognition

    Editors: Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero, Luigi Perissinotto

    Leibniz’s investigations into the structures of both natural and artificial languages as well as into the impact of language use on human cognition are widely acknowledged to have achieved real breakthroughs with respect to the early modern standard assumptions. Leibniz linked his linguistic interests with his views on mental activity by expounding the idea that language plays a fundamental role not only in communication but also in human cognition, insofar as words and signs in general serve as the indispensable thread for human thought. He used this insight into the linguistic component of thought to approach semantic phenomena such as metaphorical speech and “empty” words or phrases as well as psychological phenomena such as cognitive errors and the weakness of the will. Furthermore, his views on psycho-physical parallelism led him to explore the hypothesis that even abstract, conceptual representations have a physical counterpart in the human brain insofar as they are necessarily verbalized in a language or expressed in any other system of perceptible symbols.

    Only a minority of Leibniz’s writings on these topics were published during his lifetime. Most were posthumously discovered during the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth century, while several manuscripts are still unpublished. This state of affairs has fostered a tendency to consider Leibniz’s contributions to the philosophy of language and cognition as a sort of hidden treasure that had (and partly has) to wait for the modern scholar in order to be adequately appreciated and understood. However justified in terms of the history of manuscripts, this picture has the drawback that it obscures how much Leibniz’s ideas on language and cognition actually contributed to shaping our modernity by inspiring or influencing diverse – sometimes even opposite – philosophical trends. On the one hand, his universalistic commitments – the possibility to discover the alphabet of human thoughts, the rational grammar, and the Universal Character – fueled various modern attempts at unveiling the genuine, logical form of propositions, describing the deep structure of languages, and introducing an artificial notation for the perspicuous expression of thoughts. On the other hand, his recurring emphasis on the linguistic or generally symbolic character of blind thought became a prominent source for later accounts of higher cognitive activities as dependent on language acquisition and therefore influenced by the specific language acquired. Thus, even the origins of the so-called linguistic relativity could be traced back to some Leibnizian root.

    This journal issue aims, first, to expand our knowledge of Leibniz’s views on language, its cognitive function, and its role in other dimensions of human nature and behavior, especially moral agency; and second, to reassess Leibniz’s influence on modern philosophy of language and cognition up to the present day. Contributions may address one or more topics related to this Call and focus on Leibniz’s works, his reception, or his contemporary significance.

    Invited Contributors:

    • Stefano Gensini
    • Massimo Mugnai
    • Lucia Oliveri
    • Jean-Baptiste Rauzy

    Submission deadline: May 31th, 2021

    Notification of acceptance: June 30th, 2021

    Articles must be written in English and should not exceed 6.500 words. The instructions for authors can be consulted in the journal’s website: ‘Editorial Guidelines’.

    Submissions must be suitable for blind review. Each submission should also include a brief abstract of no more than 650 words and five keywords for indexing purposes. Notification of intent to submit, including both a title and a brief summary of the content, will be greatly appreciated, as it will assist with the coordination and planning of the issue.

    Please submit your proposals to the email jolma_editor@unive.it or using the apposite section ‘Contacts’ of the ‘Journal info’ page.

    For any query, use please the following addresses: Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero matteo.favaretti@unive.it, Luigi Perissinotto lperissi@unive.it.

Policy
  • Complete journal policy

    Ethical Code of The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts

    The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts is a peer-reviewed scientific journal whose policy is inspired by the COPE (Committee on Publication Ethics) Ethical Code. See the Best Practice Guidelines for Journal Editors.

    Publisher responsibilities  

    The Publisher must provide the Journal with adequate resources and the guidance of experts, in order to carry out its role in the most professional way, aiming at the highest quality standard.

    The Publisher must have a written agreement that defines the relationship with the owner of the Journal and/or the Editor-in-Chief. The agreement must comply with the Code of Behavior for Publishers of Scientific Journals, as established by COPE.

    The relationship among the Editor-in-Chief, the Editorial Board and the Publisher is based on the principle of publishing independence. 

    Editors responsibilities 

    The Editor-in-Chief and the Editorial Board of The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts alone are responsible for the decision to publish the articles submitted.

    Submitted articles, after having been checked for plagiarism by means of the anti-plagiarism software Compilatio that is used by the University and is made available to us, will be sent to at least two reviewers. Final acceptance presumes the implementation of possible amendments, as required by the reviewers and under the supervision of the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors.

    The The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors and Editorial Board must evaluate each submitted paper in compliance with the Journalʼs policy, i.e. exclusively on the basis of its scientific content, without discrimination of race, sex, gender, creed, ethnic origin, citizenship, or the scientific, academic and political position of the Authors. 

    If the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors and Editorial Board notice (or receive notifications of) mistakes or inaccuracies, conflict of interest or plagiarism in a published article, they will immediately warn the Author and the Publisher and will undertake the necessary actions to resolve the issue. If necessary, they will withdraw the article or publish a recantation. 

    Authors responsibilities

    Stylesheet

    Authors must follow the Guidelines for Authors to be downloaded from the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts website. 

    No multiple submissions 

    Authors must explicitly state that their work is original in all its parts and that the submitted paper has not been previously published, nor submitted to other journals, until the entire evaluation process is completed. Since no paper gets published without significant revision, earlier dissemination in conference proceedings or working papers does not preclude consideration for publication, but Authors are expected to fully disclose publication/dissemination of the material in other closely related publications, so that the overlap can be evaluated by the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors. 

    Authorship 

    Authorship must be correctly attributed; all those who have given a substantial contribution to the design, organisation and accomplishment of the research the article is based on, must be indicated as Co-Authors. The respective roles of each co-author should be described in a footnote. The statement that all authors have approved the final version should be included in the disclosure.

    Conflicts of interest and financing 

    Authors, under their own responsibility, must avoid any conflict of interest affecting the results obtained or the interpretations suggested. The The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors will give serious and careful consideration to suggestions of cases in which, due to possible conflict of interest, an Author’s work should not be reviewed by a specific scholar. Authors should indicate any financing agency or the project the article stems from. 

    Quotations

    Authors must see to it that all works consulted be properly quoted. If works or words of others are used, they have to be properly paraphrased or duly quoted. Citations between “double quotes” (or «angled quotation marks» if the text is written in a language other than English) must reproduce the exact wording of the source; under their own responsibility, Authors should carefully refrain from disguising a restyling of the source’s wording, as though it was the original formulation. 

    Ethical Committee

    Whenever required, the research protocols must be authorised in advance by the Ethical Committee of Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. 

    Emendations

    When Authors find a mistake or an inaccuracy in their own article, they must immediately warn the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors, providing all the information needed to make the due adjustments. 

    Reviewers responsibilities

    Goal

    By means of the peer-review procedure, reviewers assist the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors and Editorial Board in taking decisions on the articles submitted. They are expected to offer the Authors suggestions as to possible adjustments aimed at improving their contribution submission. 

    Timing and conflicts of interest 

    If a reviewer does not feel up to the task of doing a given review, or if she/he is unable to read the work within the agreed schedule, she/he should notify the The Journal for the Philosophy of Language, Mind and the Arts Editors. Reviewers must not accept articles for which there is a conflict of interest due to previous contributions or to a competition with a disclosed author (or with an author they believe to have identified). 

    Confidentiality 

    The content of the reviewed work must be considered confidential and must not be used without explicit authorisation by the author, who is to be contacted via the editor-in-chief. Any confidential information obtained during the peer review process should not be used for other purposes.

    Collaborative attitude

    Reviewers should see themselves not as adversaries but as advocates for the field. Any comment must be done in a collaborative way and from an objective point of view. Reviewers should clearly motivate their comments and keep in mind the Golden Rule of Reviewing: “Review for others as you would have others review for you”. 

    Plagiarism 

    Reviewers should report any similarity or overlapping of the work under analysis with other works known to them.