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The Apostle of Beauty: Some Turn-of-the-Century Perceptions of Ruskin in Central and Eastern Europe

Stuart Eagles    Independent Scholar    

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abstract

Ruskin’s writings were widely available in a range of European languages by the early years of the Twentieth century. We focus here on the Czech lands (mainly Bohemia), Hungary and Poland, with some comparative references to Russia. In these nations, Ruskin was found in partial and complete translations of individual works, anthologies of selected passages, critical studies, journal articles and in the debates these publications helped to stimulate. Ruskin was also read both in the original English, and widely in French translation. But it was not until Ruskin’s ideas began to circulate in these countries’ native languages that Ruskin’s literary merit and philosophical insights could be seriously engaged with.

keywords: Ruskin’s reception. Translation. Hungary. Czech. Poland. Russia. Leo Tolstoy. Robert de la Sizeranne.

Language: en

Published: Dec. 15, 2020  
permalink: http://doi.org/10.30687/978-88-6969-487-5/023

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