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Topic
chevron_rightAntiquity Studies

Language
en

ISBN (print)
978-88-7543-440-3

ISBN (ebook)
978-88-6969-165-2

ISSN Filologia e letteratura
chevron_right2610-8836

e-ISSN Filologia e letteratura
chevron_right2610-9352

Date of publication
01 Sep 2017

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Antichistica

Hyginus, Michael Scot (?) and the Tyranny of Technology in the Early Renaissance

Kristen Lippincott
Independent Scholar
kclippincott@gmail.com

DOI 10.14277/6969-165-2/ANT-13-10

Submitted 13 Jan 2017
Accepted 31 Mar 2017

Abstract

Whereas the earliest history of illustrations accompanying the text of Hyginus’s De Astronomia remains a mystery, the iconography found in fifteenth-century illuminated manuscripts is relatively straight-forward and fairly consistent. Intriguingly, however, the woodblock images in the first illustrated edition of the text (Venice: E. Ratdolt, 1482) do not appear to follow any known Hyginian model, but closely resemble the idiosyncratic drawings that accompany the texts of Michael Scot’s Liber introductorius. This paper explores current assumptions about Ratdolt’s pictorial model and traces the impact of his illustrations on subsequent generations of astro-mythological treatises.

Keywords
Astronomy. Manuscripts. Incunables Classical tradition. Book illustration. Illumination. Italian humanism.


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License 

Table of contents
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Campo DC Valore

dc.contributor.author

Lippincott Kristen

dc.title

Hyginus, Michael Scot (?) and the Tyranny of Technology in the Early Renaissance

dc.type

Book Chapter

dc.language.iso

en

dc.description.abstract

Whereas the earliest history of illustrations accompanying the text of Hyginus’s De Astronomia remains a mystery, the iconography found in fifteenth-century illuminated manuscripts is relatively straight-forward and fairly consistent. Intriguingly, however, the woodblock images in the first illustrated edition of the text (Venice: E. Ratdolt, 1482) do not appear to follow any known Hyginian model, but closely resemble the idiosyncratic drawings that accompany the texts of Michael Scot’s Liber introductorius. This paper explores current assumptions about Ratdolt’s pictorial model and traces the impact of his illustrations on subsequent generations of astro-mythological treatises.

dc.relation.ispartof

Antichistica

dc.relation.ispartof

Filologia e letteratura

dc.publisher

Edizioni Ca’ Foscari - Digital Publishing

dc.date.issued

2017-09-01

dc.dateAccepted

2017-01-13

dc.dateSubmitted

2017-03-31

dc.identifier.uri

http://doi.org/10.14277/6969-165-2/ANT-13-10

dc.identifier.issn

2610-8828

dc.identifier.eissn

2610-9344

dc.identifier.isbn

978-88-7543-440-3

dc.identifier.eisbn

978-88-6969-165-2

dc.rights

Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution alone

dc.rights.uri

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

item.fulltext

with fulltext

item.grantfulltext

open

dc.subject

Astronomy

dc.subject

Manuscripts

dc.subject

Incunables Classical tradition

dc.subject

Book illustration

dc.subject

Illumination

dc.subject

Italian humanism

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