Venetians and Ottomans in the Early Modern Age

Venetians and Ottomans in the Early Modern Age

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Tema
chevron_rightLingue e culture del Medio ed Estremo Oriente

Lingua
en

ISBN (print)
978-88-6969-261-1

ISBN (ebook)
978-88-6969-260-4

ISSN
chevron_right2610-9484

e-ISSN
chevron_right2610-8895

Data pubblicazione
27 Set 2018

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Hilâl

The last Venetian-Byzantine Trade Agreement and Mehmed II’s First Peace Agreement with Venice

Iassen Vanev
South-West University “Neofit Rilski”, Bulgaria
iassen.vanev@gmail.com

DOI 10.30687/978-88-6969-260-4/004

Submitted 19 Gen 2018
Accepted 10 Mar 2018

Abstract

The goal of this article is to compare two inter-state commercial charters as the title suggests, a chrysobull by the Byzantine emperor John VIII and a document signed by Mehmed the Conqueror. The Ottoman Empire at that time was expanding at the expense of the Venetian thalassocracy, and particularly Byzantium. Venice, in its turn, was deriving more trade privileges from the dying Byzantine Empire. The emphasis in the article will be put on the similarities between the documents proving the continuity in the various spheres of international politics in the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period.

Keywords
Venice. Byzantium. Ottoman empire. John VIII Paleologus. Sultan Mehmed II. Trade privileges. Ahd-nāme. Chrysobull.


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License 

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Campo DC Valore

dc.contributor.author

Vanev Iassen

dc.title

The last Venetian-Byzantine Trade Agreement and Mehmed II’s First Peace Agreement with Venice

dc.type

Book Chapter

dc.language.iso

en

dc.description.abstract

The goal of this article is to compare two inter-state commercial charters as the title suggests, a chrysobull by the Byzantine emperor John VIII and a document signed by Mehmed the Conqueror. The Ottoman Empire at that time was expanding at the expense of the Venetian thalassocracy, and particularly Byzantium. Venice, in its turn, was deriving more trade privileges from the dying Byzantine Empire. The emphasis in the article will be put on the similarities between the documents proving the continuity in the various spheres of international politics in the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period.

dc.relation.ispartof

Hilâl

dc.publisher

Edizioni Ca’ Foscari - Digital Publishing

dc.date.issued

2018-09-27

dc.dateAccepted

2018-01-19

dc.dateSubmitted

2018-03-10

dc.identifier.uri

http://doi.org/10.14277/978-88-6969-260-4/004

dc.identifier.issn

2610-9484

dc.identifier.eissn

2610-8895

dc.identifier.isbn

978-88-6969-261-1

dc.identifier.eisbn

978-88-6969-260-4

dc.rights

Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution alone

dc.rights.uri

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

item.fulltext

with fulltext

item.grantfulltext

open

dc.subject

Venice

dc.subject

Byzantium

dc.subject

Ottoman empire

dc.subject

John VIII Paleologus

dc.subject

Sultan Mehmed II

dc.subject

Trade privileges

dc.subject

Ahd-nāme

dc.subject

Chrysobull

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