English Literature
3 | 2016

English Literature
3 | 2016

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Topic
chevron_rightLiterature

Language
en

ISSN
chevron_right2385-1635

e-ISSN
chevron_right2420-823X

Online issue
Vol. 3 | Num. 1 | Dicembre 2016

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English Literature | 3 | 2016

Italy in Postcolonial Discourse
Jhumpa Lahiri, Michael Ondaatje, Nuruddin Farah

Carmen Concilio
Università degli Studi di Torino, Italia
carmen.concilio@unito.it

DOI 10.14277/2420-823X/EL-3-16-6

Accepted 05 Aug 2016

Abstract

In this essay, I would like to explore the representations of Italy through the eyes of three outstanding postcolonial writers: Jhumpa Lahiri, Michael Ondaatje and Nuruddin Farah. Even though Italy is an oasis of art and culture, Jhumpa Lahiri looks at it with a profound sense of both admiration and sadness in Hema and Kaushik (2008). Her scrutiny of the ancient, pre-imperial ruins of the Etruscan period leads her characters to question life, death and marital life. Similarly, Ondaatje opposes an Italian Renaissance villa to the debris left behind by war in his well-known The English Patient (1992). His Punjabi character Kirpal Singh mentions Gabicce Mare, a place that soon after World War II will become a memorial and cemetery for the Indian troops who fought and died for the liberation of Italy. This discourse is picked up by Helena Janaczeck, a Polish-Italian writer who combines a narrative on Polish migration in Italy with an elegiac narrative about the cemetery and memorial in Cassino, where a Maori goes to visit the tombs of his ancestor, who also participated with the Commonwealth troops in World War II. Nuruddin Farah too, who provides a reportage on Somali immigrants to Italy, seems to consider the country as a springboard either to other North European destinations or to a possible destiny back home. All three writers present Italy according to varied and unusual perspectives.

Keywords
Lahiri. Ondaatje. Farah. Postcolonial Italy.

Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License 

Table of contents
×
Campo DC Valore

dc.contributor.author

Concilio Carmen

dc.title

Italy in Postcolonial Discourse

dc.type

Journal Article

dc.language.iso

en

dc.identifier.uri

http://doi.org/10.14277/2420-823X/EL-3-16-6

dc.description.abstract

In this essay, I would like to explore the representations of Italy through the eyes of three outstanding postcolonial writers: Jhumpa Lahiri, Michael Ondaatje and Nuruddin Farah. Even though Italy is an oasis of art and culture, Jhumpa Lahiri looks at it with a profound sense of both admiration and sadness in Hema and Kaushik (2008). Her scrutiny of the ancient, pre-imperial ruins of the Etruscan period leads her characters to question life, death and marital life. Similarly, Ondaatje opposes an Italian Renaissance villa to the debris left behind by war in his well-known The English Patient (1992). His Punjabi character Kirpal Singh mentions Gabicce Mare, a place that soon after World War II will become a memorial and cemetery for the Indian troops who fought and died for the liberation of Italy. This discourse is picked up by Helena Janaczeck, a Polish-Italian writer who combines a narrative on Polish migration in Italy with an elegiac narrative about the cemetery and memorial in Cassino, where a Maori goes to visit the tombs of his ancestor, who also participated with the Commonwealth troops in World War II. Nuruddin Farah too, who provides a reportage on Somali immigrants to Italy, seems to consider the country as a springboard either to other North European destinations or to a possible destiny back home. All three writers present Italy according to varied and unusual perspectives.

dc.relation.ispartof

English Literature

dc.relation.ispartof

Vol. 3 | Num. 1 | Dicembre 2016

dc.publisher

Edizioni Ca’ Foscari - Digital Publishing

dc.date.issued

None

dc.dateAccepted

None

dc.dateSubmitted

2016-08-05

dc.identifier.issn

2385-1635

dc.identifier.eissn

2420-823X

dc.rights

Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution alone

dc.rights.uri

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

dc.subject

Lahiri

dc.subject

Ondaatje

dc.subject

Farah

dc.subject

Postcolonial Italy

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