Rassegna iberistica
41 | 109 | 2018

Rassegna iberistica
41 | 109 | 2018

  pdf


Views 25
Downloads 0

Tema
chevron_rightLetterature

Lingua
es

ISSN
chevron_right0392-4777

e-ISSN
chevron_right2037-6588

Fascicolo
Vol. 41 | Num. 109 | Giugno 2018

Condividi

Metadati

Rassegna iberistica | 41 | 109 | 2018

Minorías prósperas en la economía corsaria literaria
Brahín en Los cautivos de Argel y David en Guzmán el Bravo

Michael Gordon
Universidad de North Carolina, Wilmington, USA
gordonm@uncw.edu

DOI 10.30687/Ri/2037-6588/2018/109/002

Submitted 18 Lug 2017
Accepted 27 Ott 2017

Abstract

Spanish literature written by captives or about captivity in North Africa distinguished itself from the majority of Spanish Golden Age works because of its positive portrayal of Jews. Not only were these literary representations benevolent, but they were also quite realistic. Like many of their historical counterparts, the literary Jews Brahín (Los cautivos de Argel) and David (Guzmán el Bravo) practiced their religion clandestinely in Spain before moving to the Maghreb, where they enjoyed greater freedoms and privileges, including the ability to legally own Christian slaves. Multiple 17th-century autobiographical accounts from Spanish captives in Algiers and Tunis can serve as historical templates to corroborate the precarious, yet simultaneously prosperous, situation of those two literary Jews. Finally, the similarities found in historical sources and these two North African works challenges the notion of Lope de Vega being unequivocally anti-Jewish.

Keywords
Lope de Vega. Jews. Captives. Algiers. Tunis.

Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License 

Sommario
×
Campo DC Valore

dc.contributor.author

Gordon Michael

dc.title

Minorías prósperas en la economía corsaria literaria

dc.type

Journal Article

dc.language.iso

es

dc.identifier.uri

http://doi.org/10.14277/2037-6588/Ri-41-109-18-2

dc.description.abstract

Spanish literature written by captives or about captivity in North Africa distinguished itself from the majority of Spanish Golden Age works because of its positive portrayal of Jews. Not only were these literary representations benevolent, but they were also quite realistic. Like many of their historical counterparts, the literary Jews Brahín (Los cautivos de Argel) and David (Guzmán el Bravo) practiced their religion clandestinely in Spain before moving to the Maghreb, where they enjoyed greater freedoms and privileges, including the ability to legally own Christian slaves. Multiple 17th-century autobiographical accounts from Spanish captives in Algiers and Tunis can serve as historical templates to corroborate the precarious, yet simultaneously prosperous, situation of those two literary Jews. Finally, the similarities found in historical sources and these two North African works challenges the notion of Lope de Vega being unequivocally anti-Jewish.

dc.relation.ispartof

Rassegna iberistica

dc.relation.ispartof

Vol. 41 | Num. 109 | Giugno 2018

dc.publisher

Edizioni Ca’ Foscari - Digital Publishing

dc.date.issued

2018-06-11

dc.dateAccepted

2017-07-18

dc.dateSubmitted

2017-10-27

dc.identifier.issn

0392-4777

dc.identifier.eissn

2037-6588

dc.rights

Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution alone

dc.rights.uri

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

dc.subject

Lope de Vega

dc.subject

Jews

dc.subject

Captives

dc.subject

Algiers

dc.subject

Tunis

Download

×

41 | 109 | 2018

Sommario