Armenia, Caucaso e Asia Centrale

Armenia, Caucaso e Asia Centrale

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Tema
chevron_rightLingue e culture del Medio ed Estremo Oriente

Lingua
it

ISBN (print)
978-88-6969-219-2

ISBN (ebook)
978-88-6969-211-6

ISSN
chevron_right2610-8879

e-ISSN
chevron_right2610-9433

Data pubblicazione
19 Feb 2018

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Eurasiatica

La Vita siriaca di Pietro l’Ibero e la Vita greca di Melania la giovane
Due testi a confronto

Claudia Tavolieri
Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Italia
claudia.tavolieri@tiscali.it

DOI 10.30687/978-88-6969-211-6/004

Submitted 02 Nov 2017
Accepted 05 Dic 2017

Abstract

The two parallel biographies, the Syriac Life of Peter the Iberian, the Georgian prince who converted to Christianity, and the Life of Melania the Younger, the Roman patrician, have come down to us through a manuscript tradition and attest to the spread of monastic practices in Palestine around the 5th century. The texts allow us to investigate this phenomenon through the interpretation of selected passages which show how the common narrative of some certain significant events attests to the existence (and the fervent activity) of monastic circuits in Gaza, marked by particular lifestyles and guided by doctrinal choices. This inquiry, as well as providing important information on a certain kind of monasticism, offers the chance to make useful comparisons with the other forms of monasticism that enlivened the East in Late Antiquity.

Keywords
Monastic practices. Biographies. Manuscript tradition. Palestine. Gaza.    


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License 

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Campo DC Valore

dc.contributor.author

Tavolieri Claudia

dc.title

La Vita siriaca di Pietro l’Ibero e la Vita greca di Melania la giovane

dc.type

Book Chapter

dc.language.iso

it

dc.description.abstract

The two parallel biographies, the Syriac Life of Peter the Iberian, the Georgian prince who converted to Christianity, and the Life of Melania the Younger, the Roman patrician, have come down to us through a manuscript tradition and attest to the spread of monastic practices in Palestine around the 5th century. The texts allow us to investigate this phenomenon through the interpretation of selected passages which show how the common narrative of some certain significant events attests to the existence (and the fervent activity) of monastic circuits in Gaza, marked by particular lifestyles and guided by doctrinal choices. This inquiry, as well as providing important information on a certain kind of monasticism, offers the chance to make useful comparisons with the other forms of monasticism that enlivened the East in Late Antiquity.

dc.relation.ispartof

Eurasiatica

dc.publisher

Edizioni Ca’ Foscari - Digital Publishing

dc.date.issued

2018-02-19

dc.dateAccepted

2017-11-02

dc.dateSubmitted

2017-12-05

dc.identifier.uri

http://doi.org/10.14277/6969-211-6/EUR-7-3

dc.identifier.issn

2610-8879

dc.identifier.eissn

2610-9433

dc.identifier.isbn

978-88-6969-219-2

dc.identifier.eisbn

978-88-6969-211-6

dc.rights

Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution alone

dc.rights.uri

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

item.fulltext

with fulltext

item.grantfulltext

open

dc.subject

Monastic practices

dc.subject

Biographies

dc.subject

Manuscript tradition

dc.subject

Palestine

dc.subject

Gaza

dc.subject

   

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Armenia, Caucaso e Asia Centrale

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