Axon
2 | 1 | 2018

Axon
2 | 1 | 2018

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chevron_rightAntiquity Studies

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it

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chevron_right2532-6848

Online issue
Vol. 2 | Num. 1 | Giugno 2018

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Axon | 2 | 1 | 2018

Xanthus Stele’s Epigram

Margherita Facella
Università di Pisa, Italia
margherita.facella@unipi.it

DOI 10.30687/Axon/2532-6848/2018/01/007

Submitted 10 Jan 2018
Accepted 01 Apr 2018

Abstract

One of the most well-known monuments of the so-called acropolis of Xanthos (Lycia) is a large pilaster originally supporting a burial chamber and the statue of the deceased. On the sides of the pillar are two fragmentary inscriptions in Lycian A and B (Milyan), beside a Greek epigram of 12 lines. The epigram celebrates Harpagus, who excelled in sporting and military competitions and was devoted to gods and in particular to Zeus. The name of this dynast is only partially preserved, but can be confidently restored as Gergis and identified with Kheriga who appears on the Lycian texts. Comparison with the other texts of the stele, where Darius II, Artaxerxes II, Tissaphernes, Amorges and other people are mentioned, allows us to date the inscription at the end of the 5th century. The epigram shows that Greek was already used in Lycia before the Hellenistic period; the choice of the Greek language by a dynasty tracing itself back to the powerful Kuprlli shows the intention to state its prestige and political power also in the face of a Greek or Hellenized public.

Keywords
Xanthos. Licia. Epigramma. Arpago. Gergis. Kheriga.

Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License 

Table of contents
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Campo DC Valore

dc.contributor.author

Facella Margherita

dc.title

Xanthus Stele’s Epigram

dc.type

Journal Article

dc.language.iso

it

dc.identifier.uri

http://doi.org/10.14277/2532-6848/2018/001/01

dc.description.abstract

One of the most well-known monuments of the so-called acropolis of Xanthos (Lycia) is a large pilaster originally supporting a burial chamber and the statue of the deceased. On the sides of the pillar are two fragmentary inscriptions in Lycian A and B (Milyan), beside a Greek epigram of 12 lines. The epigram celebrates Harpagus, who excelled in sporting and military competitions and was devoted to gods and in particular to Zeus. The name of this dynast is only partially preserved, but can be confidently restored as Gergis and identified with Kheriga who appears on the Lycian texts. Comparison with the other texts of the stele, where Darius II, Artaxerxes II, Tissaphernes, Amorges and other people are mentioned, allows us to date the inscription at the end of the 5th century. The epigram shows that Greek was already used in Lycia before the Hellenistic period; the choice of the Greek language by a dynasty tracing itself back to the powerful Kuprlli shows the intention to state its prestige and political power also in the face of a Greek or Hellenized public.

dc.relation.ispartof

Axon

dc.relation.ispartof

Vol. 2 | Num. 1 | Giugno 2018

dc.publisher

Edizioni Ca’ Foscari - Digital Publishing

dc.date.issued

2018-06-29

dc.dateAccepted

2018-01-10

dc.dateSubmitted

2018-04-01

dc.identifier.issn

dc.identifier.eissn

2532-6848

dc.rights

Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution alone

dc.rights.uri

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

dc.subject

Xanthos

dc.subject

Licia

dc.subject

Epigramma

dc.subject

Arpago

dc.subject

Gergis

dc.subject

Kheriga

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