Through the Working Class

Through the Working Class

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Topic
chevron_rightSociology

Language
en

ISBN (print)
978-88-6969-297-0

ISBN (ebook)
978-88-6969-296-3

ISSN
chevron_right2610-8852

e-ISSN
chevron_right2610-9379

Date of publication
12 Dec 2018

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Culture del lavoro

Othered Bodies and Ecophobia
Mamak Garbage Area

Gizem Yılmaz
Hacettepe University, Turkey
zgizemyz@gmail.com

DOI 10.30687/978-88-6969-296-3/005

Submitted 20 Jul 2018
Accepted 29 Aug 2018

Abstract

This study aims to examine Mamak Garbage Area and the residents in that neighbourhood within ecophobic discourse in terms of analysing why and how they have become the target of ecophobic psyche. Garbage areas in general constitute elemental bodies combining natural elements and human influences since these areas are human-made natural storage yards. Moreover, junkyards reflect the relationship between human and nonhuman encounters. However, when disastrous results are experienced, human beings simply blame nature itself for the wrongdoings of the human practices. Furthermore, ecophobia is also targeted towards the human bodies residing in the garbage areas and depending on garbage for their living. Moreover, similar to wild nature, those human bodies are also excluded from the civil order, contributing to the discursive deep clash between nature and culture.

Keywords
Ecophobia. Mamak Garbage Area. Garbage. Dirt. Nature vs Culture.


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License 

Table of contents
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Campo DC Valore

dc.contributor.author

Yılmaz Gizem

dc.title

Othered Bodies and Ecophobia

dc.type

Book Chapter

dc.language.iso

en

dc.description.abstract

This study aims to examine Mamak Garbage Area and the residents in that neighbourhood within ecophobic discourse in terms of analysing why and how they have become the target of ecophobic psyche. Garbage areas in general constitute elemental bodies combining natural elements and human influences since these areas are human-made natural storage yards. Moreover, junkyards reflect the relationship between human and nonhuman encounters. However, when disastrous results are experienced, human beings simply blame nature itself for the wrongdoings of the human practices. Furthermore, ecophobia is also targeted towards the human bodies residing in the garbage areas and depending on garbage for their living. Moreover, similar to wild nature, those human bodies are also excluded from the civil order, contributing to the discursive deep clash between nature and culture.

dc.relation.ispartof

Culture del lavoro

dc.publisher

Edizioni Ca’ Foscari - Digital Publishing

dc.date.issued

2018-12-12

dc.dateAccepted

2018-07-20

dc.dateSubmitted

2018-08-29

dc.identifier.uri

http://doi.org/10.14277/978-88-6969-296-3/005

dc.identifier.issn

2610-8852

dc.identifier.eissn

2610-9379

dc.identifier.isbn

978-88-6969-297-0

dc.identifier.eisbn

978-88-6969-296-3

dc.rights

Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution alone

dc.rights.uri

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

item.fulltext

with fulltext

item.grantfulltext

open

dc.subject

Ecophobia

dc.subject

Mamak Garbage Area

dc.subject

Garbage

dc.subject

Dirt

dc.subject

Nature vs Culture

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