Armenia, Caucaso, Asia Centrale

Armenia, Caucaso, Asia Centrale

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Topic
chevron_rightLanguages and Cultures of the Middle and Far East

Language
it

ISBN (print)
978-88-6969-280-2

ISBN (ebook)
978-88-6969-279-6

ISSN
chevron_right2610-8879

e-ISSN
chevron_right2610-9433

Date of publication
15 Nov 2018

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Eurasiatica

Jan Baudouin de Courtenay, Hugo Schuchardt, Nikolaj Marr e un’enigmatica iscrizione georgiana

Vittorio Tomelleri
Università degli Studi di Macerata
vittorio.tomelleri@unimc.it

DOI 10.30687/978-88-6969-279-6/005

Abstract

Around the end of the 19th century, a philologically and linguistically rather insignificant inscription on a cross, written in Old Georgian script, drew the attention of the Polish linguist Jan Baudouin de Courtenay, who, however, was not able to identify neither the language nor the alphabet. After having drafted in his own hand several copies of the inscription, he submitted them to scholars and orientalists all around Europe, without getting a univocal or satisfying answer; he then consulted in Petersburg the Georgian philologist Nikolay Marr, who provided a transcription of the Georgian text in the modern (civil) alphabet and a Russian translation. The present paper describes and discusses how surprised and disappointed were the linguist Hugo Schuchardt and Nikolay Marr himself about Baudouin de Courtenay’s not impeccable publication of the Old Georgian inscription and, above all, the fact that he had introduced the edition with a detailed enumeration of the many failed attempts at deciphering the mysterious alphabet. In the appendix the short statement by Nikolay Marr, written in Russian, is reprinted with an Italian translation by Margarita Blinova.

Keywords
Baudouin de Courtenay. Hugo Schuchardt. Nikolay Marr. Inscriptions. Old Georgian alphabet.


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License 

Table of contents
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Campo DC Valore

dc.contributor.author

Tomelleri Vittorio

dc.title

Jan Baudouin de Courtenay, Hugo Schuchardt, Nikolaj Marr e un’enigmatica iscrizione georgiana

dc.type

Book Chapter

dc.language.iso

it

dc.description.abstract

Around the end of the 19th century, a philologically and linguistically rather insignificant inscription on a cross, written in Old Georgian script, drew the attention of the Polish linguist Jan Baudouin de Courtenay, who, however, was not able to identify neither the language nor the alphabet. After having drafted in his own hand several copies of the inscription, he submitted them to scholars and orientalists all around Europe, without getting a univocal or satisfying answer; he then consulted in Petersburg the Georgian philologist Nikolay Marr, who provided a transcription of the Georgian text in the modern (civil) alphabet and a Russian translation. The present paper describes and discusses how surprised and disappointed were the linguist Hugo Schuchardt and Nikolay Marr himself about Baudouin de Courtenay’s not impeccable publication of the Old Georgian inscription and, above all, the fact that he had introduced the edition with a detailed enumeration of the many failed attempts at deciphering the mysterious alphabet. In the appendix the short statement by Nikolay Marr, written in Russian, is reprinted with an Italian translation by Margarita Blinova.

dc.relation.ispartof

Eurasiatica

dc.publisher

Edizioni Ca’ Foscari - Digital Publishing

dc.date.issued

2018-11-15

dc.dateAccepted

2018-05-21

dc.dateSubmitted

2018-06-03

dc.identifier.uri

http://doi.org/10.14277/978-88-6969-279-6/005

dc.identifier.issn

2610-8879

dc.identifier.eissn

2610-9433

dc.identifier.isbn

978-88-6969-280-2

dc.identifier.eisbn

978-88-6969-279-6

dc.rights

Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution alone

dc.rights.uri

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

item.fulltext

with fulltext

item.grantfulltext

open

dc.subject

Baudouin de Courtenay

dc.subject

Hugo Schuchardt

dc.subject

Nikolay Marr

dc.subject

Inscriptions

dc.subject

Old Georgian alphabet

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